NNLM Training Office November 17th, 2017
CategoriesCategories Contact Us Archives Our Office Search

Jan

06

Date prong graphic

Questions Anyone?

Posted by on January 6th, 2014 Posted in: Training Tips


Those two words (or any variation) make me dread the seconds that follow. Sometimes someone asks a question and I’m relieved that I’m not going to be left at the front of the room feeling like I offered a hand shake and nobody shook it back; a little awkward. So, we’re there at the front of the room or online doing some synchronous training and we ask: are there any questions? Current training trends suggest that you wait 9 seconds before moving on to give students time to catch up and formulate a question. But that isn’t even the issue I’m talking about here today.

Today, I am suggesting that we don’t even want to ask “are there any questions?”. Maybe the students will tell us, within 9 seconds, that they don’t have questions. OK. Asked and answered. However, if truth be told, I want more than a yes or a no answer. I want a conversation. I want a little back and forth with the students. So, instead of asking a question that may cut off any future discussion, try one of these 5 open-ended questions posed by Rebecca Alber of edutopia.org and an instructor at UCLA’s Graduate School of Education.

  1. What do you think? This question is designed to get input from the class and is not a yes or no question. Yea!
  2. Why do you think that? This question is designed to make sure the student knows how or why they came to their answer.
  3. How do you know this? This question might elicit examples from experience.
  4. Can you tell me more? Need I say more about this question?
  5. What questions do you still have? This question is designed to loop back around to the beginning or stir up new questions about what was just discussed (hopefully, there was a discussion).

Image of the author ABOUT Rebecca Brown


Email author View all posts by

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked with an asterisk *

 

Developed resources reported in this site are supported by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health (NIH) under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012344 with the University of Utah Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NIH.

NNLM and NATIONAL NETWORK OF LIBRARIES OF MEDICINE are service marks of the US Department of Health and Human Services | Copyright | Download PDF Reader