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Region 5 Blog April 12th, 2024
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Dec

30

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Plan to Be Smoke-Free in 2015

Posted by on December 30th, 2014 Posted in: Health Literacy, Public Health


As we head toward the end of this year, the CDC offers a few tips for a smoke-free 2015.

Every January 1, people all over the world make New Year’s resolutions. If you’re one of the nearly 7 out of 10 current U.S. smokers who want to quit, why not get started today? Smoking is still the number one cause of preventable death and disease in the United States. Quitting now can cut your risk for diseases caused by smoking and leave you feeling stronger and healthier. Most smokers who want to quit try several times before they succeed, but you can take steps that can improve your chances of quitting for good.

Develop a Quit Plan: Planning ahead is a major part of successfully quitting smoking. Smokefree.gov offers details on how to create an effective quit plan.

Use Free, Effective Resources: There are many free resources for people trying to quit smoking. Check out 1-800-QUIT-NOW, a call line and source of encouraging texts; Smokefree TXT, which sends texts of encouragement and advice to your phone; and Smokefree Apps, apps to help you become– and stay–smoke-free. A few information pages also provide tips and personal stories. Check out pages on Smoking (MedlinePlus), Quitting Smoking (CDC), and Tips From Former Smokers (CDC).

Find a Medication That’s Right for You: Many options are available if you are considering using medications to help you quit smoking. Studies show that smokers who use medicine to help control cravings, along with coaching from a quit line, in a group, or from a counselor, are much more likely to succeed than those who go it alone.

Even if you don’t smoke yourself, you can use this article to help a friend or family member become smoke-free in 2015!

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Developed resources reported in this program are supported by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health (NIH) under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012343 with the University of Washington.

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