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Even iPhone gamers can learn from NLM Resources

Posted by on August 22nd, 2016 Posted in: NLM Resources, Outreach, Public Health, Technology


I spent far too many hours in my high school Chemistry class playing Bejeweled on my laptop (sorry Ms. Schultz!), so when I started reading up on NLM’s resources for K-12 students, I was immediately interested when I saw that iPhone and online games are included on this list.

Up until now, the closest thing I’ve played to a health sciences iPhone game is Amateur Surgeon 3, which lets you make surgical incisions with a pizza cutter, so I think it’s safe to say it has absolutely zero educational value. Thankfully, the NLM’s selection of iOS games covers a lot more bases when it comes to educational content.

There’s Bohr Thru, which is a Bejeweled-style matching game for junior and high school students with objectives to collect the correct subatomic particles to create the first 18 elements on the periodic table. Players are even challenged to build Bohr models during bonus rounds – something that was extremely challenging for me due to my previous life as a Chemistry class slacker. After completing a level, the loading page includes more information about the atoms and elements to read while you wait.

bohr_thru_screenshot

Now that’s more like it. This game successfully reminded me what subatomic particles are. (from itunes.apple.com)

For younger kids, there’s an online game called ToxMystery, where you accompany a cute cat named Toxie around a house to look for dangerous and hazardous chemicals. You’re even expected to identify the chemicals that can be found around the house – for instance, that Mercury can leak from a broken thermostat. The game teaches the students how to identify household toxins and gives them easy-to-understand information about why exactly they’re dangerous. It’s definitely an effective game for curious kiddos and cat lovers alike.

ToxMystery_screenshot

As a child I would have been super invested in the game just based on Toxie alone. (from oxmystery.nlm.nih.gov).

To learn more about what NLM can offer for K-12 students – from a much more reliable source than someone who just spent a good chunk of work time playing mobile games – plan to tune in to the joint GMR and SCR webinar about NLM K-12 resources.

Connection Information
Webinar Title: Education Connection: Connecting Health and Science in the Classroom
Date: Thursday, August 25, 2:00pm CST
To Join the Meeting:

  1. Go to: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/JointWebinarAug
  2. At the login screen, choose “Enter as a Guest” and type in your name
  3. Call-in information will be available in the room.
  4. Please use *6 to mute or un-mute your phone.

For a complete topic summary, presenter bio, and information about CE credit, check out this blog post from last week.

Molly Olmstead (molly-olmstead@uiowa.edu) promises she won’t play so many iPhone games tomorrow.

Image of the author ABOUT Molly Roberts
Molly grew up in Michigan but now lives in Iowa City with her husband Seth, dog Fenway, and cat Whiskey. She's an avid reader and is currently trying to read everything Haruki Murakami has ever written.

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This project has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Grant Number 1UG4LM012346 with The University of Iowa.

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