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Dec

14

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Fresh Christmas Trees Might be Hosting Uninvited Guests

Posted by on December 14th, 2017 Posted in: Blog


“First Christmas” by Jared Lind via Unsplash, December 2, 2017, CCO.

Christmas trees typically are adorned with ornaments, lights, and the usual Christmas decorations.  Occasionally, a cat will even find its way into the tree.  This holiday season, consumers should also be aware of unwanted critters that may find their way into homes clinging to a freshly cut Christmas tree, said Texas A&M University entomologist, Dr. David Ragsdale.   “It should be no surprise that when a living plant is brought into the house it has hitchhikers,” he said.

The Department of Entomology at Penn State University has a complete online listing of the different types of insects you might find on your tree and the potential harm that insect might cause.  The good news?  Most do not pose a significant threat to your health or the health of other plants you have in your home.

The experts do have a list of tips to help minimize the risk of insects on your tree:

  • Tree farms often have mechanical shakers that can be used to help dislodge dead pine needles and insects.
  • Vigorously shake the tree before bringing it inside your home.
  • Do a visual inspection of the tree and remove any egg masses or nests.
  • Do NOT use any type of aerosol or insecticide as these are flammable.

 

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