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SEA Currents October 25th, 2020
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Operationalizing the CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance in Research Data Management

Posted by on September 22nd, 2020 Posted in: Continuing Education, Data Science


Description: Extractive and unethical research practices led to the accumulation of Indigenous collections in vast national repositories that have missing, incomplete, and impoverished records and metadata. These problems of inequity continue in the ways Indigenous Peoples’ data is created, stored, accessed, and used. Indigenous Peoples insist on the urgent need to integrate Indigenous knowledges and approaches into data and collections practices and policies. The articulation of Indigenous Peoples’ rights and interests in data about their peoples, communities, cultures, and territories is directed towards reclaiming control of data, data ecosystems, and data narratives in the context of open data and open science. The people and purpose-oriented CARE Principles (Collective Benefit, Authority to Control, Responsibility, and Ethics) reflect the crucial role of data in advancing innovation, governance, and self-determination among Indigenous Peoples. The CARE Principles complement and extend the more data-centric approach of the FAIR Principles (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable). This webinar will focus on the CARE Principles and identify practical tools for implementing the CARE Principles alongside the FAIR Principles in the context of the open science and open data environments.

This is part of the Research Data Management Webinar Series.

Presenter: Stephanie Russo Carroll (Ahtna-Native Village of Kluti Kaah) is Assistant Research Professor, Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy (UC); Associate Director and Manager – Tribal Health Program, the Native Nations Institute (NNI) in the UC; Assistant Professor in the Public Health Policy and Management Program at the Community, Environment and Policy Department, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health (MEZCOPH); Assistant Professor, American Indian Studies Graduate Interdisciplinary Program; and Co-Director, Center for Indigenous Environmental Health Research, MEZCOHP at the University of Arizona (UA).

Stephanie’s research explores the links between Indigenous governance, data, the environment, and community wellness. Her interdisciplinary lab group, the Collaboratory for Indigenous Data Governance Research, develops research, policy, and practice innovations for Indigenous data sovereignty. Indigenous data sovereignty draws on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples that reaffirms the rights of Indigenous nations to control data about their peoples, lands, and resources. The lab’s research, teaching, and engagement seek to transform institutional governance and ethics for Indigenous control of Indigenous data, particularly within open science, open data, and big data contexts. The lab primarily collaborates with Indigenous Peoples and nations in the US Southwest and the Arctic, as well an international network of Indigenous data sovereignty and governance experts. Lab members also often partner with communities to which they belong, including Indigenous communities. (https://nni.arizona.edu/people/staff/stephanie-carroll-rainie(link is external))

When: September 24th, 2020 | 11 PT/12 MT/1 CT/2 ET

Register: https://nnlm.gov/rdm-webinar-sept2020

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Funded under cooperative agreement number UG4LM012340 with the University of Maryland, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, and awarded by the DHHS, NIH, National Library of Medicine.

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